Accès direct au contenu

PPSM

Version anglaise

aide

Accueil > Publications / brevets > MecanoFluoroChromisme

Recherche - Valorisation

Revealing the Origins of Mechanically Induced Fluorescence Changes in Organic Molecular Crystals

Wilbraham, L; Louis, M; Alberga, D; Brosseau, A; Guillot, R; Ito, F; Labat, F; Metivier, R; Allain, C; Ciofini, I, Advanced Materials, 2018, 30, 1800817.

Références :

Advanced Materials, 2018, 30, 1800817.99.

Auteur(s) : 

Wilbraham, L; Louis, M; Alberga, D; Brosseau, A; Guillot, R; Ito, F; Labat, F; Metivier, R; Allain, C; Ciofini, I

Mechanofluorochromic molecular materials display a change in fluorescence color through mechanical stress. Complex structure–property relationships in both the crystalline and amorphous phases of these materials govern both the presence and strength of this behavior, which is usually deemed the result of a mechanically induced phase transition. However, the precise nature of the emitting species in each phase is often a matter of speculation, resulting from experimental data that are difficult to interpret, and a lack of an acceptable theoretical model capable of capturing complex environmental effects. With a combined strategy using sophisticated experimental techniques and a new theoretical approach, here the varied mechanofluorochromic behavior of a series of difluoroboron diketonates is shown to be driven by the formation of low‐energy exciton traps in the amorphous phase, with a limited number of traps giving rise to the full change in fluorescence color. The results highlight intrinsic structural links between crystalline and amorphous phases, and how these may be exploited for further development of powerful mechanofluorochromic assemblies, in line with modern crystal engineering approaches.

graphical abstract
Type :
Publication
Dates :
Paru le 12 juillet 2018
Informations complémentaires :
DOI: 10.1002/adma.201800817

 

Publications antérieures 

2015
2014
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007

Recherche d'un document

Recherche d'un document